Sugarcane Books

Sugarcane is grown commercially in the tropics and subtropics and is known to be one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world. It is difficult to determine when cane sugar became the principal sweetener, although it first achieved dominance on the subcontinent of India more than 2500 yr ago. It was in that country and China that commercial sugar was first produced from sugarcane. However, it was not until the early eighteenth century that sugar began to be widely used in Western Europe. Sugarcane was unknown in the New World until Columbus introduced it on his second voyage in 1493. This revised edition of Frank Blackburn's comprehensive book Sugar-cane (Longman Publ., 1984) deals mainly with the agricultural aspects of growing sugarcane (Saccharum spp.).

This book covers the sugar cane plant, crop production and services, the latter comprising engineering, research and administration. It aims at providing the reader with information regarding the cost-effective production of a good crop of sugar cane. The significance of the book is the provision of practical information for the farmer engaged in the production of the crop. The cultivation and management of sugar cane is discussed, with emphasis given to cultivation and management practices. Supporting services of agricultural engineering and research are given special attention.

SELLING FRESH SUGAR CANE FROM MALAYSIA

There are 2 types of sugar cane in our plantation which are suitable for making juice concentrated and white sugar production.

We have the above mentioned sugarcane plantation in Malaysia with a good quality Grade A sugarcane products to our customer.

We have the best sugarcane you could find worldwide. We are selling fresh sugar cane from Malaysia with a very competitive price and quality guarantee.

Our sugar canes are mainly for the fresh sugar cane juice and making sugar with more than 90% sweetness. Currently, we have 50-100acres in Malaysia will be expanded in this two years time. We are looking for long term business relationship with the buyer worldwide,especially from local, Singapore and Middle East countries.

If you are interested, please do not hesitate to contact time. The term and condition & pricing are negotiable. We offer USD$340of 1000kg sugar cane excluded the transportation cost. Delivery time is 2 weeks.

Sugar Cane Cultivation and Management
This book covers the sugar cane plant, crop production and services, the latter comprising engineering, research and administration. It aims at providing the reader with information regarding the cost-effective production of a good crop of sugar cane. The significance of the book is the provision of practical information for the farmer engaged in the production of the crop. The cultivation and management of sugar cane is discussed, with emphasis given to cultivation and management practices. Supporting services of agricultural engineering and research are given special attention.

Sugarcane (World Agriculture Series)

Product Description
From enhancing the flavour of food to providing a substrate for fermentation, sugar is renowned worldwide for its importance as a commodity. For many centuries sugarcane has been cultivated and developed, and we now have a huge range of crop varieties. Based on Blackburn’s highly successful Sugarcane, originally published in 1984, this new edition has been fully revised and expanded by an international team of widely respected sugarcane specialists. Focussing on the agricultural aspects of the crop, this book follows a logical progression from the botany and breeding through to planning cultivation, control of weeds, pests and diseases, harvest management and payment for cane.

Book Description
From enhancing the flavour of food to providing a substrate for fermentation, sugar is renowned worldwide for its importance as a commodity. For many centuries sugarcane has been cultivated and developed, and we now have a huge range of crop varieties.Based on Blackburn's highly successful Sugarcane, originally published in 1984, this new edition has been fully revised and expanded by an international team of widely respected sugarcane specialists. Focussing on the agricultural aspects of the crop, this book follows a logical progression from the botany and breeding through to planning cultivation, control of weeds, pests and diseases, harvest management and payment for cane.An invaluable asset to those involved in planning or running sugar estates as well as small producersAn easy-to-follow reference for students and agriculturalists alikeComprehensive reference sections and further reading.

Cane Sugar Handbook : A Manual for Cane Sugar Manufacturers and Their Chemists

Product Description
In print for over a century, it is the definitive guide to cane sugar processing, treatment and analysis. This edition expands coverage of new developments during the past decade—specialty sugars, plant maintenance, automation, computer control systems and the latest in instrumental analysis for the sugar industry.

From the Publisher
In print for over a century, it is the definitive guide to cane sugar processing, treatment and analysis. This edition expands coverage of new developments during the past decade--specialty sugars, plant maintenance, automation, computer control systems and the latest in instrumental analysis for the sugar industry.

Sweet Cane: The Architecture of the Sugar Works of East Florida

Product Description
From the late eighteenth century to early 1836, the heart of the Florida sugar industry was concentrated in East Florida, between the St. Johns River and the Atlantic Ocean. Producing the sweetest sugar, molasses, and rum, at least 22 sugar plantations dotted the coastline by the 1830s. This industry brought prosperity to the region--employing farm hands, slaves, architects, stone masons, riverboats and their crews, shop keepers, and merchant traders. But by January 1836, Native American attacks of the Second Seminole War, intending to rid the Florida frontier of settlers, devastated the whole sugar industry. Although sugar works again sprang up in other Florida regions just prior to the Civil War, the competition from Louisiana and the Caribbean blocked a resurgence of sugar production for the area. The sugar industry would never regain its importance in East Florida--only two of the original sugar works were ever rebuilt. Today, remains of this once thriving industry are visible in a few parks. Some are accessible but others lie hidden, slowly disintegrating and almost forgotten. Archaeological, historical, and architectural research in the last decade has returned these works to their once prominent place in Florida's history, revealing the beauty, efficiency of design, as well as early industrial engineering. Equally important is what can be learned of the lives of those associated with the sugar works and the early plantation days along the East Florida frontier.

Cane and Labour: The Political Economy of the Queensland Sugar Industry, 1862-1906

Product Description
An analysis of the economic and social history of indentured Pacific Island labour migrants in the Queensland sugar industry, and of the rise and fall of the extensive system of plantations upon which the workers laboured. The period covered is 1862-1906. The book employs the method of historical materialism and the analytical approach of political economy. The analysis begins with a detailed economic history of the industry in which the primary focus is the explanation of the emergence and then the decline of plantation production. Attention then moves to the social history of immigrants in Queensland; their living and working conditions, health and mortality, the sociology of the plantation, the legislative and administrative instruments of the state, a detailed study of the extensive forms of social control to which the immigrants were subject, including the practices of deferred pay and the trade box system, and how the islanders invoked a wide range of strategies to resist the employers and the state. The concluding chapter attempts to set the historical experience of Pacific Islanders in Queensland into an international context, and in particular to contrast it with orthodox assumptions about the "primitive or static" nature of plantation production and the fashionable portrayal of systems of post-slavery systems of indentured labour as a "new system of slavery".

The Sugar Cane Industry: An Historical Geography from its Origins to 1914 (Cambridge Studies in Historical Geography)

Product Description
Sugar cane has long been one of the world's most important cash crops, and the sugar cane industry can be regarded as one of the world's oldest industries. The industry involves three basic processes: the cultivation of cane, the milling of the cane to extract the juice and the rendering of the juice into crystal sugar. This book is a geography of the sugar cane industry from its origins to 1914. It describes the spread of the industry from India into the Mediterranean during medieval times, across to the Americas in the early years of European colonization, and its subsequent diffusion to most parts of the tropics. It examines changes in agricultural techniques over the centuries, the significance of improvements in milling and manufacturing techniques, and the role of the industry through its demand for labor in forming the multicultural societies of the tropical world. It is the first authoritative study of the development of the industry, in English, in forty years.

Book Description
This book is a geography of the sugar cane industry from its origins to 1914. It describes its spread from India into the Mediterranean during medieval times, to the Americas and its subsequent diffusion to most parts of the tropics. It examines the changes in agricultural and manufacturing techniques over the centuries, and its impact in forming the multicultural societies of the tropical world.

Sugarcane Ethanol: Contributions to Climate Change Mitigation and the Environment

Brazil is the dominant player in the ethanol from sugarcane market and it is set to expand its production writes TheBioenergySite senior editor, Chris Harris. Sugarcane Ethanol: Contributions to Climate Change Mitigation and the Environment Brazil is the dominant player in the ethanol from sugarcane market and it is set to expand its production writes TheBioenergySite senior editor, Chris Harris.

However, a book from Wageningen Academic Publishers - Sugar Ethanol - Contributions to Climate Change Mitigation and the Environment - looks at how this expansion will affect the Brazilian country and agricultural economy, its environment and the effect on global land use. The book, edited by Peter Zuubier and Jos van de Vooren, sets out to answer whether biofuels do help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and at the same time offer new sources of income for farmers; whether they compete with food for arable lane and at the same time contribute to higher food prices and are they threatening the environment. The book largely limits itself to sugarcane and the contribution it has on climate change mitigation and the environment. Zuubier and van de Vooren show that Brazil is dominant in the production of sugarcane with the country accounting for 75 per cent of the increase in the area of land allotted to sugarcane between 2000 and 2007. Brazil also had two thirds of the global increase in production during that period.

The book looks at the massive expansion of sugarcane cultivation in Brazil. It shows that the main areas of cultivation are in the São Paulo state area and that 99 per cent of the land that was taken over for growing sugarcane in 2007 and 2008 was from pasture land or agricultural land - more than 2 million hectares. It says that pasture land was responsible for 45 per cent of the increase and agricultural land 50 per cent. The rest came from citrus fields and also deforestation. Between 2002 and 2006 773 hectares of pasture land changed to production of sugarcane, 103,000 hectares changed from land used for other crops and 125,000 hectares started to be used for sugarcane production from land previously unused. The book says that Brazil was predicted to reach 11.7 million hectares of land for sugarcane production by the end of last year.

However, Zuubier and van de Vooren say that there is no evidence to show that deforestation is a direct consequence of sugarcane production. Nevertheless, the book does show that sugarcane production in Brazil does comply with the targets for greenhouse gas reduction. It outlines two scenarios - aiming to increase the electricity surplus with cane biomass residues and using residues for ethanol production. Both scenarios look to the future to 2020. The success of Brazil's sugarcane to bioenergy production is down to the fact that it can produce high levels of ethanol, 7,000 litres of ethanol per hectare, and electricity, 6.1 MW hours per hectare, with low input of fertiliser and chemicals. The country is also reducing greenhouse gas emissions and has scheduled the end of sugarcane burning by 2014. Brazil's forecast production of ethanol by the end of last year was 70 billion litres, with 80 per cent of this being used in transport.

The book says that ethanol production for Brazil, the USA and the EU should reach 165 billion litres by 2020 and at the same time vehicle efficiency will lead to a slowdown in demand for transport fuels. It forecasts that changes in technology could see transport returns of km per litre of ethanol. The future for the industry will be determined by the diversity of the regions supplying ethanol and the present international market could become a truly global market.

However, it shows that there is a changing market for ethanol with the emergence of lignocellulosic ethanol, second generation ethanol production. It shows that first generation technologies are not sustainable and will not reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It sees the production of ethanol from sugarcane, and to some extent palm oil and jatropha seed oil, as sustainable because they will not compete with food production in the same way that other crops used for ethanol do.

The book also looks at the different mandates that have been put in place by governments around the world and compares the feasibility of the US and EU policies with those in Latin America, Africa and Oceania.

It says that sugarcane ethanol can contribute to achieving the Millennium Development Goals because of its advantages over fossil fuels.

However, it says that the development of oil prices is also crucial to the development of biofuels.

But it is the environmental benefits from sugarcane ethanol production that stand out in the biofuels market.

In his foreword to the book, José Goldemberg, professor at the University of São Paulo summed up the influence that an expanding Brazilian sugarcane ethanol production will have on the world markets.

"The present area used of sugarcane for ethanol production in Brazil today is approximately 4 million hectares out of 20 million hectares used in the world by sugarcane in almost 100 countries. Increasing the areas used for of sugarcane for ethanol production in these countries by 10 million hectares would result in enough ethanol to replace 10 per cent of the gasoline in the world leading to a reduction of approximately 50 million tons of carbon per year. This would help significantly many OECD countries to meet the policy mandates adopted for the use of biofuels," he said.

"Such course of action would of course require a balanced weighting of the advantages of replacing gasoline by a renewable fuel and impacts and land use and biodiversity.